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Mechanical Keyboards

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Mechanical Keyboards

Posted by Rafael Lopes on .

Hello friend! Today I’m here to anounce that my dream as a nerd has been achieved: typing in a mechanical keyboard. I knew this kind of keyboard on a business trip to China, where a colleague addicted me onto this retro technology! Thank you, Michael Zou!

I must say: it’s delicious, and it gives me a lot of energy to type, as a blogger it wouldn’t fit better! :)

The model I’m writing is Filco Majestouch 2 Ninja with blue switches. If you don’t know what I’m talking about and would like to learn more about mechanical keyboards, continue reading…

A mechanical keyboard is a keyboard built with high quality, typically spring activated, key switches. These key switches vary based on the keyboard’s application or user preference. There are a lot of brands in the market, I like the WASDKeyboards and Filco (japanese) ones.

While some of the first widely sold keyboards such as IBM’s Model M in the 1980’s utilized mechanical switches, the 1990’s brought on a wave of inexpensive rubber dome keyboards that flooded the keyboard market. Rubber dome keyboards represent over 90% of keyboards in use today and provide an inexpensive but dissatisfying feel and typing experience.

Rubber comparison

after trying a mechanical keyboard, you will never want to type on those shitty rubber again.
Rubber Switches

after trying a mechanical keyboard, you will never want to type on those shitty rubber again.

our whole universe was in a hot dense state, then nearly fourteen billion years ago expansion started. Wait...
Mechanical Switches

our whole universe was in a hot dense state, then nearly fourteen billion years ago expansion started. Wait...

Mechanical keyboards raise the bar in every way. A mechanical keyboard’s switches, framing, functionality, type print methods, key construction, PCB board, LED lighting (sharpness, brightness, adjustability), and a slew of other features are far superior compared to traditional rubber dome keyboards. Most of these improvements boil down to one thing – feel. Mechanical keyboards simply feel better than rubber dome keyboards.

CHERRY® MX Blue Switch

Audible and tactile click very beneficial for typing, audio feedback lets you know when the switch has actuated.
Cherry MX® Blue

Audible and tactile click very beneficial for typing, audio feedback lets you know when the switch has actuated.

  • Datasheet
  • Tactile: Yes, click.
  • Actuation Force: 50cN (60cN Peak Force).
  • Key Travel: 2mm to actuation, 4mm to bottom.
  • Disadvantages:
    • Release point lies above the actuation point, can be very detrimental to double-tapping.
    • Shorter lifetime than linear switches (still 20 million operations).

CHERRY® MX Brown Switch

Small tactile bump helps you know when the switch has actuated, can be useful for typing or holding the switch above the actuation point for gaming. Actuation/release points at the same point in the travel, benefits double-tapping. Relatively light actuation force, good for long periods of typing.
Cherry MX® Brown

Small tactile bump helps you know when the switch has actuated, can be useful for typing or holding the switch above the actuation point for gaming. Actuation/release points at the same point in the travel, benefits double-tapping. Relatively light actuation force, good for long periods of typing.

  • Datasheet
  • Tactile: Yes, small bump.
  • Actuation Force: 45g (55g Peak Force).
  • Key Travel: 2mm to actuation, 4mm to bottom.
  • Disadvantages:
    • The tactile bump is sufficiently small that some people don’t find it useful.
    • Shorter lifetime than linear switches (still 20 million operations).

CHERRY® MX Red Switch

Linear travel beneficial for some gamers who don't use the tactility of some other switches. Actuation/release points at the same point in the travel. Higher lifetime than tactile switches.
Cherry MX® Red

Linear travel beneficial for some gamers who don't use the tactility of some other switches. Actuation/release points at the same point in the travel. Higher lifetime than tactile switches.

  • Datasheet
  • Tactile: No.
  • Actuation Force: 45cN.
  • Key Travel: 2mm to actuation, 4mm to bottom
  • Disadvantages:
    • Some people find them too light to type or game with as they are relatively susceptible to accidental key presses.
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Rafael Lopes (?)

Tech-lover, also loves photography and curiosity. AWS Cloud Ninja. What I enjoy? Learn from unknown internet blogs like this one.